In the US, judges usually prefer granting bail to keep with the code of law one is innocent until proven guilty. But that doesn’t always mean it’s a slam dunk. Sometimes the circumstances of a crime or the circumstances of the accused’s life can lead to higher bail amounts or flat-out denial. 

Repeat offenders are particularly susceptible to the more stringent rulings. But what exactly does the court look for when making these determinations? In the following article, we’ll be discussing considerations for when it isn’t your first offense. Let’s begin. 

A History of Offending

When you have more than one arrest on your record, it automatically increases the odds that you won’t be granted bail or that the amount set will be so high you can’t even afford the 10 percent bond-posting fee that most bondsmen require. That said, there are plenty of cases where your past doesn’t factor in. For instance, if you have a record but it isn’t one filled with serious or violent felonies, then the court likely will treat your current charge as a first offense. 

Past Bail Behaviors

If you have been granted bail before on a prior offense and honored the terms of it, then you will not be viewed as much of a flight risk. This will encourage the court to set a bail amount that is reasonable in conjunction with the offense. That said, it isn’t your ticket out of jail. If the nature of the current offense is particularly serious and you could pose a threat to yourself or others, then past bail behaviors won’t matter as much. 

Familial and Work Responsibilities 

Another part of determining whether you’re a flight risk is looking at the mitigating factors in your personal life. Do you have a job? Will missing too much work create a greater hardship on you and your family before guilt is proven? Do you have children you support? Even repeat offenders may be given the benefit of the doubt if they have no sign of violence toward their family and they otherwise meet their objectives as a caregiver and spouse. 

How to Deal with the Stress

While most cases are referred for bail, there’s a lot of stress that comes with not knowing. And once you do know, there’s stress in wondering if you’ll still have a job, the respect of your family and friends, and enough money to post the bond. At Doc’s Bail Bonds, we treat every situation like yours with the utmost care in a spirit of helpfulness. Contact us today to see for yourself. 

[Featured Image by Air Force, fair use]